Lee & Garasia, LLC
  • Tel: 732-516-1717
  • Toll free: 888-404-5876
Experience, Accessibility, and Excellence for Over 20 Years
  • "Lee and Garasia are excellent lawyers, punctual and professional. They are dedicated to going above and beyond the usual level of service to meet your client's needs. Their staff is very knowledgeable, friendly and polite. I would highly... recommend this firm to anyone." Read More

  • "I would definitely recommend Mr.Lee and Garasia as an immigration attorney because they did a great job with my case i.e. of Adjustment of Status (i-485). Mr. Lee helped us in each and every detailed information and prepared to the best of it. It was all well done and would like to appreciate." Read More

  • "I would like to thank my lawyer Mr Lee & Garasia and the staff for all immense help and patience throughout this entire process, I really appreciate your constant attention to my case, as well to my questions and my concerns. You've really made this process much more comprehensive to me, which I greatly appreciate." Read More

  • "Mr. Lee and Ms. Garasia did a great job with my renewal of my permanent residence application. They help prepare the paperwork with such a great attention to details and accuracy. I will recommend the law firm every time." Read More

  • "Mr. Lee did a great job with the renewal of my permanent residence application. My case was very time sensitive and they worked really fast on my case with great detail and accuracy. I will recommend the law firm every time." Read More

  • "I would recommend Attorney Paris Lee for anybody who needs immigration consultation. Mr. Lee is THE lawyer who respects and cares clients. Mr. Lee is professional and honest. Bottom line, preparation for the results and NO BS!" Read More

  • "Stalin - Lee did a wonderful job, Got my wife her visa in one year. He is extremely helpful and knowledgeable. I would highly recommend him for all your immigration needs." Read More

  • "Hello. I appoint him as my immigration lawyer and that way he solved my cases was truly amazing. He was so honest and knowledgeable for his work.He solved my all family immigration issues and because of his effort we were able to get done our immigration work done successful. Thank you lee and garasia." Read More

  • "Lee & Garasia stand for accountability and responsibility. They are reliable, honest and are always constructively looking for a solution. A big thanks :)" Read More

Immigration Court Archives

Denied U Visa Applicants and Battered Spouses May Be Placed Into Immigration Court

Earlier last month, we wrote about USCIS implementing the new Notice to Appear Policy Memorandum released on June 28 of this year. According to a bulletin released late last week, the second phase of expansion is scheduled to take place November 19, 2018. On and after this date, USCIS will begin applying the new policy to the following types of applications upon denial:

New Ruling Curbs Immigration Court's Power to Dismiss or Terminate Deportation Cases

On September 18, 2018, Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued Matter of S-O-G & F-D-B, 27 I & N Dec. 462 (A.G. 2018), the latest in a trifecta of cases curtailing the authority of immigration judges. Under this new ruling, judges are strictly prohibited from terminating or dismissing cases "for reasons other than those expressly set out in the relevant regulations or where DHS has failed to sustain the charges of removability." As it stands, the regulations set out only a limited number of circumstances under which the court may dismiss proceedings. On motion by DHS government counsel, a judge may dismiss proceedings where

Notice to Appear Not Defective If Notice of Hearing Later Issued | Pereira Motion Update

Over the Labor Day weekend, the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) quietly released an important decision that has a significant impact on individuals hoping to file "Pereira motions." In Matter of Bermudez-Cota, 27 I & N Dec. 441 (BIA 2018), the court held that a Notice to Appear that does not specify the time and place of a person's initial removal hearing does not divest an Immigration Judge of jurisdiction so long as a Notice of Hearing specifying this information is later sent to the individual. In the case at hand, the respondent filed a Motion to Terminate arguing that his case should be dismissed in light of the Supreme Court's decision in Pereira v. Sessions, in which the highest court in the land declared that a Notice to Appear lacking the required information (as to date, time, and place) does not stop the clock for purposes of calculating physical presence eligibility for cancellation of removal. After the decision came out, many attorneys also extrapolated from the Court's clear language that such Notices to Appear were, in effect, not only defective for cancellation of removal purposes but defective per se. This gave birth to "Pereira motions" which have seen mixed results in New Jersey, with some judges granting and others, denying.

Immigration Judges No Longer Allowed To Postpone Cases Without "Good Cause"

Following on the heels of Castro-Tum, the Attorney General has issued another ruling that erodes the judicial independence of our immigration judiciary and further mechanizes the courtroom into an assembly line. In Matter of L-A-B-R, 27 I & N Dec. 405 (A.G. 2018), AG Sessions ruled that continuances may only be granted for "good cause." Instead of allowing judges to exercise their own discretion, the ruling constrains them to push cases forward, prioritizing administrative efficiency over due process and substantive relief. 

Supreme Court Opens Door for Cancellation of Removal for Thousands of Immigrants

On June 21, 2018, the Supreme Court issued an extremely important decision with potentially large-scale ramifications for thousands of people in removal proceedings. In Pereira v. Sessions, the Court held that the stop-rule governing continuous presence for cancellation of removal cases is not triggered by service of a notice to appear that does not specify the time and place at which removal proceedings are to be held.

What Happens If I Don't Show Up For My Immigration Court Hearing in Newark?

Given the current climate and anti-immigrant sentiment these days, people placed into proceedings are understandably petrified of going to immigration court. There is a common misconception that once somebody summoned to court shows up, he/she will be summarily removed. This is not accurate at all. The whole point of going to court is to protect your constitutional due process rights and hold the government to its burden before an impartial judge. In fact, the consequences of not showing up for court without good cause are legally and practically more severe. If anything, an individual who does not show up is far more likely to be expelled without recourse than a person who sees the process through with competent counsel.

Defective Notice To Appear Does Not Stop 10 Years | Green Cards

Last week, the Third Circuit issued an important precedential decision regarding the "stop-time rule" and cancellation of removal. In Orozco-Velasquez v. Attorney General, the Court held a defective Notice to Appear ("NTA") did not effectively stop the clock for purposes of showing the requisite ten years physical presence for cancellation of removal. (According to our immigration laws, any period of continuous physical presence shall end when the alien is served with a Notice to Appear.) In the case, the government had initially served an NTA that not only listed the wrong location for the Court hearing, but lacked "fundamental, statutorily required information" necessary to give the alien reasonable notice of the charges against him and "the basic contours of the proceedings to come." To be more specific, the notice did not inform him of the specific date and time of the removal proceedings, only that they were "to be set." Nearly two years later, the government served a second NTA that listed the correct location and a specific time and date. In the course of litigation, Mr. Orozco-Velasquez submitted an application for cancellation of removal, which the government argued he was precluded from filing, due to the first NTA. The Judge agreed with the Department of Homeland Security.

Is There Any Way To Get a 2019 Immigration Court Hearing Scheduled Earlier?

Thumbnail image for bigstock-Courtroom-Trial-70035736.jpgPlease subscribe to our US Citizenship and Family Immigration Podcast on Itunes. This is a transcript of Episode #3 in which we talk about immigration court and 2019 hearings.  

Does a Notice to Appear Trigger Stop Time Rule for Cancellation of Removal?

Although it may not have generated much attention in the media, a very important precedential decision was issued by the Board of Immigration Appeals last month. Lawyers who practice deportation and removal defense certainly know about, or certainly, should. The decision is Matter of ORDAZ, 26 I & N Dec. 637 (BIA 2015) and it is especially relevant in these times given the seemingly endless delay of individuals having their day in immigration court. The decision concerns the "stop-time" rule and whether service of a Notice To Appear that does not result in commencement of removal proceedings effectively triggers the stop-time rule for purposes of cancellation of removal.

PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION

    • Avvo Rating 10.0 | Superb
    • Client Distinction Award martindale.com | 2016 Martindale-Hubbell Client Distinction Award
    • New Jersey State Bar Association | Paris Lee Chair - Immigration Section 2015-2016
    • Nationally Recognized | Newsweek Nationwide Showcase | Top Attorneys 2013
    • New Jersey Chapter | American Immigration Lawyers Association | Angie Garasia | Chapter Chair 2015-2016
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Lee & Garasia, LLC
190 State Route 27
Edison, NJ 08820

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