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Citizenship and Naturalization Archives

New Residence Rules for People Born Abroad Claiming Citizenship Through Parent

During his administration, President Trump has repeatedly proclaimed his intentions on ending birthright or automatic citizenship for those born within the United States. To be clear, birthright citizenship is still intact, but the latest USCIS policy memo pertaining to residency for citizenship arguably represents an encroachment. Policy Memo PA-2019-05, issued on August 28 of this year, received much attention in the media regarding changes to the way USCIS will now adjudicate citizenship petitions for children of US government employees and armed forces members. Under the new policy, as elaborated in the memo, children of US government employees and armed forces members residing outside the United States will no longer be considers "residing in the United States" for purposes of citizenship applications filed under section 320 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Section 320 is a part of the law that grants citizenship to certain children under the age of 18 who did not acquire citizenship at birth but who are residing in the legal and physical custody of a citizen parent pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent residence. (In these cases, the child applies for a Certificate of Citizenship, as opposed to filing to become a citizen through the naturalization process.) The upshot of the new rules, effective October 29, 2019, is that these children born abroad must now pursue applications for citizenship under a different section, notably section 322, which is more cumbersome and requires the child to complete the naturalization process before the age of 18. Because this is an extremely complex area, some news outlets may have exaggerated and oversimplified its impact, though there is no dispute amongst most immigration attorneys that the new guidance discriminates against armed forces families and threatens to damage morale.

False Claim to Citizenship Does Not Need To Be Knowing to Trigger Deportation

A deeply jarring decision from the Board of Immigration Appeals came out late last month pertaining to the issue of false claims to US Citizenship. Under Section 237(a)(3)(D)(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, "an alien who falsely represents, or has falsely represented himself to be a citizen of the United States for any purpose or benefit under this Act (including section 274A) or any Federal or State law is deportable." What makes this case, Matter of Zhang, 27 I & N Dec. 569 (BIA 2019), interesting is that the Board held that a false claim need not necessarily be made knowingly in order to render an individual deportable. Here, Mr. Zhang purchased a naturalization certificate without having undergone the examination, and it was questionable as to whether he knowingly or unknowingly tried to circumvent the process. On appeal, Mr. Zhang maintained that he in good faith believed that he was a US citizen and argued that the government bore the burden of demonstrating that he made the false claim willfully or knowingly.

Citizenship Test Will Be Changing | N-400 Test Changes

Green Card holders interested in becoming United States Citizens should be aware that USCIS is planning on revising the civics test as part of a new decennial review and revision process. Under this plan, the citizenship test will be reviewed every ten years and if necessary, revised to ensure accuracy, timeliness, as well integrity. The test was last revised in 2009.

Are You Already a US Citizen? | N-400 Issues in New Jersey

The vast majority of lawful permanent residents aspiring to become United States Citizens will need to undergo the naturalization process. But in some cases, an individual may already be a citizen through application of the law pertaining to either automatic acquisition or derivation. In those instances, a person will need to apply for proof of citizenship by either applying for a US Passport or a Certificate of Citizenship via Form N-600. Unfortunately, the law regarding acquisition of citizenship can be incredibly complex. Depending on when certain conditions are/were fulfilled will determine which set of rules apply. A recent Third Circuit case, Dessouki v. Attorney General, illustrates just how fact-sensitive some of these determinations can be.

The N-400 Citizenship Form May Undergo More Changes

In recent years, many of the most commonly filed immigration forms underwent substantial revisions. These include the I-130 Petition for Alien Relative; I-129F Petition for Fiance; I-485 Application to Adjust Status; and N-400, Application for Naturalization. Rather than simplifying what is often an arcane process, the forms arguably obfuscate and complicate things even more. Soon, it is very likely that the N-400 will be changing again. Unfortunately, some of the proposed revisions and requirements will make the process more onerous and confusing, especially to a layperson who might be attempting to file pro-se.

DWI Convictions May Bar Citizenship and Cancellation of Removal

In yet another ominous sign of the erosion of judicial independence, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker recently certified a case to himself that may have a significant impact on foreign nationals charged with Drunk Driving or Driving Under The Influence. The case is Matter of Castillo-Perez, and this case is particularly important given the issues that the Attorney General will be deciding-possibly overruling previous BIA precedent. According to the certification, the Attorney General is directing the parties to address the following questions:

Divorce Prior to Oath Ceremony Can Result in Denial of 319 Citizenship Application

USCIS recently clarified that lawful permanent residents applying to naturalize on the basis of marriage to a US Citizen must not only demonstrate "living in marital union" with their spouse three years immediately prior to filing, but also that termination of the marriage at any time prior to the Oath of Allegiance renders an applicant ineligible under section INA 319(a). We have seen this second provision being strictly applied to deny naturalizations applications where the applicant divorces after passing the examination but prior to the oath ceremony. Practically speaking, this may not affect residents in states that administer the oath the same day as the interview, such as New Jersey. In general, however, most states regularly schedule the oath ceremony many months after the applicant has passed the examination. This gap can, in some cases, be quite long, especially if background checks are being conducted, an officer needs to look into something, or on occasion, neglects to finish reviewing the file. In the interim, an applicant's marital situation may rapidly deteriorate and the couple may seek a quick dissolution. Unfortunately, if this occurs prior to the oath, the applicant has technically fallen outside the boundaries of INA 319, the section of the law that allows green card holders to apply after only three years marriage to a US Citizen (versus the normal requirement of five years permanent residence prior to becoming eligible). This is one reason why applicants are expected to review and complete a questionnaire on the day of the oath verifying that certain information has not changed, ie., address; arrests; trips outside the US; and in this case, marital status.

Citizenship Test Changes | USCIS To Use Digital Tablets for Reading and Writing

On October 3, 2018, USCIS issued a public bulletin regarding the incorporation of digital tablets into the naturalization reading and writing process. Our office began seeing implementation of tablets a few months back, and this announcement not only confirms that this practice is here to stay but that technology will assume an even greater role in the process than ever before. Previously, citizen applicants were asked to review and digitally sign their applications on iPad or ipad-like devices. Now under this expansion, the use of pen and paper is essentially being phased out and discontinued. Pen and paper may be used "on a case-by-case basis," but by and large, both the reading and writing components of the N-400 examination will now be conducted on digital tablets:

Cheating and US Citizenship | Reasons for N-400 Denial

Most people are aware that a criminal record may complicate and sometimes pose a bar to citizenship. However, having a clean record does not necessarily ensure that a naturalization application will be approved. Interestingly, there are several types of acts or conduct that USCIS may consider conditional bars to citizenship if they occur within the "statutory period" under evaluation (five years prior to the N-400 application, for most applicants). Under the Immigration and Nationality Act ("INA") and Code of Federal Regulations ("CFR"), officers are entitled to evaluate and determine whether certain specified acts, offenses, activities, or circumstances reflect poorly on or militate against an applicant's "good moral character," which is a fundamental requirement for citizenship.

Government Pushing To Take Away People's US Citizenship | Denaturalization Campaign

Over the last few weeks, we have witnessed a sustained effort by the government to implement President Trump's agenda on immigration. Besides organizing a relentless push to ferret out and detain illegal immigrants, the enforcement branch of DHS appears to be slowly co-opting the benefits division. This is reflected in the two recent USCIS policy memoranda quietly released in July. In addition to this, the thehill.com reported recently that there is now a concerted effort to organize a task force of attorneys to review the cases of naturalized US Citizens who may have lied on their applications and start denaturalization proceedings against them. It is unclear just how many applications will be reviewed but it is possible that nearly 17 million cases approved from 1990 to 2016 may be reverified.

PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION

    • Avvo Rating 10.0 | Superb
    • Client Distinction Award martindale.com | 2016 Martindale-Hubbell Client Distinction Award
    • New Jersey State Bar Association | Paris Lee Chair - Immigration Section 2015-2016
    • Nationally Recognized | Newsweek Nationwide Showcase | Top Attorneys 2013
    • New Jersey Chapter | American Immigration Lawyers Association | Angie Garasia | Chapter Chair 2015-2016
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