COVID-19 UPDATE: USCIS HAS RESUMED APPOINTMENTS. CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE BY PHONE OR VIDEO.
Tel: 732-516-1717
Toll Free: 888-404-5876
Experience, Accessibility, and Excellence
for Over 20 Years
“When it comes to immigration, I go to Paris and Angie–and trust me, I know a lot of lawyers all over the world.”–Renzo Gracie, Brazilian Jiujitsu and MMA Legend 
Read More
“Lee and Garasia are excellent lawyers, punctual and professional. They are dedicated to going above and beyond the usual level of service to meet your client’s needs. Their staff is very knowledgeable, friendly and polite. I would highly… recommend this firm to anyone.”
Read More
“I would definitely recommend Mr.Lee and Garasia as an immigration attorney because they did a great job with my case i.e. of Adjustment of Status (i-485). Mr. Lee helped us in each and every detailed information and prepared to the best of it. It was all well done and would like to appreciate.”
Read More
“I would like to thank my lawyer Mr Lee & Garasia and the staff for all immense help and patience throughout this entire process, I really appreciate your constant attention to my case, as well to my questions and my concerns. You’ve really made this process much more comprehensive to me, which I greatly appreciate.”
Read More
“Mr. Lee and Ms. Garasia did a great job with my renewal of my permanent residence application. They help prepare the paperwork with such a great attention to details and accuracy. I will recommend the law firm every time.”
Read More
“Mr. Lee did a great job with the renewal of my permanent residence application. My case was very time sensitive and they worked really fast on my case with great detail and accuracy. I will recommend the law firm every time.”
Read More
“I would recommend Attorney Paris Lee for anybody who needs immigration consultation. Mr. Lee is THE lawyer who respects and cares clients. Mr. Lee is professional and honest. Bottom line, preparation for the results and NO BS!”
Read More
“Stalin – Lee did a wonderful job, Got my wife her visa in one year. He is extremely helpful and knowledgeable. I would highly recommend him for all your immigration needs.”
Read More
“Hello. I appoint him as my immigration lawyer and that way he solved my cases was truly amazing. He was so honest and knowledgeable for his work. He solved my all family immigration issues and because of his effort we were able to get done our immigration work done successful. Thank you lee and garasia.”
Read More
“Lee & Garasia stand for accountability and responsibility. They are reliable, honest and are always constructively looking for a solution. A big thanks :)”
Read More

What is the Affidavit of Support?

An important step in the family-based immigration process (and some employment-based cases) is demonstrating that the intending immigrant will not become a “public charge.” This is established through a legally binding contract called the Affidavit of Support (USCIS Form I-864) that lasts until the sponsored immigrant becomes a U.S. Citizen or is credited with roughly forty work quarters (which translates to approximately ten years).

The Affidavit of Support must be signed and executed by the Petitioner, who must be at least 18 years old, hold US Citizenship or lawful permanent residence, and maintain a US residence. The Petitioner must show that he/she has enough income (and/or assets) to “maintain the intending immigrant(s) and the rest of [petitioner’s] household at 125 percent of the Federal Poverty Guidelines.” This is usually done through the submission of financial evidence in the form of tax returns, W-2s, and a current job letter. The applicable poverty guideline level is determined by the sponsor’s household size. If the sponsor fails to meet the minimum income requirement, he or she may choose to supplement his/her income with that of a household member via Form I-864A or a joint sponsor through another I-864.

Any sponsor must realize that the Affidavit of Support is a serious commitment. In the event that the immigrant applies for and receives a designated means-tested benefit, the petitioner can be held legally responsible to reimburse the agency that provided the benefit. There is even a court decision out there that holds that this obligation survives divorce.

Additionally, since there have been countless instances of a petition being questioned or outright denied by immigration due to a sponsor’s inability to meet the relevant financial requirements, careful attention must be paid to the Affidavit of Support instructions to determine which documents can pass muster. Furthermore, because the poverty guideline level is determined by a sponsor’s “household size,” the actual number of people in the household must be accurately determined. While this may sound simple in theory, it can and sometimes does get complicated, especially when one must consider the sponsor’s dependents as well as any current lawful permanent residents who were beneficiaries of a sponsor’s previous Affidavit of Supports.